Tagged how to

plate and egg cup tutorial

Make: scribble decorated breakfast set

I’ve been thinking about using a ceramic pen to decorate some simple, plain white plates and things for a while. I found these egg cups and plates in Hobbycraft, along with the ceramic pen so thought I would give it a go. I had no particular design in mind, but wanted it to be simple, fun and not to cover the entire surface. I came up with the idea of just scribbling in a masked-off area and I think it looks quite effective.

All you need is some ceramic objects that have been washed in warm soapy water and thoroughly dried, a ceramic pen, and masking tape. The pen I used doesn’t require you to bake the items in the oven, but takes 3 days to dry before you can use or put in the dishwasher.

ceramic pen project

decorating with ceramic pendecorating a plate

plate and egg cup tutorial

drawing with porcelain painter

decorate plate and egg cup tutorial

plate and egg cup tutorial

plate and egg cup tutorial

plate and egg cup tutorial

kim-signature

black-stripe

knockout by kim osborne

Buy Knockout linoprints, illustrations and greetings cards online

Buy Knockout pillows, iPhone cases and prints through Society 6

 

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aztec inspired reduction linoprint

Make: a reduction linoprint

There’s nothing quite as satisfying as a good reduction linoprint! In an effort to continue experimenting and trying new things I thought I’d try a little reduction print today, I was inspired by Aztec patterns, having just bought a brilliant Aztec inspired cardigan in the sales.

I took lots of pics as I went along, so thought I would share the process with you here. Right, lets get started…

You will need

  • Images/sketches etc for inspiration
  • Lino¬† – cut the the size you would like your print
  • Pencil
  • Permanent marker
  • Lino cutting tools
  • Lino printing inks, roller, and something to roll out your ink, a plastic tray for example
  • Smooth paper to print on
  • Cardboard cut to the same size as the paper you are printing on
  • Masking tape
  • A brayer or spoon

reduction lino print - how to

First draw out your pattern on to the lino. I wanted to make an Aztec inspired print so I did a bit of online image research first for some ideas. I kept the pattern simple but with enough going on the be interesting. Try choosing a theme and picking out a few repetitive elements to get you started.

reduction lino print - how to

I like to go over my pattern with a permanent marker so that I can continue to see my pattern throughout the process, so you can do this once you have finalised your design.

Now to begin cutting. The idea with a reduction linoprint is that we use the same lino block for all three colours we are using. This means we need to cut away a little bit more of the lino each time we want to print a new colour. It’s best to start with the lightest colour, I’ve chosen a metallic bronze ink, so cut away on the lino the areas on the print you want to remain white (the colour of the paper). As you can see from the above photograph I have only cut a way a few areas, meaning there will only be a little bit of white on the finished print.

registering a lino print

Once you’re happy with the lino, place it in the centre of the piece of cardboard and use the masking tape to mark where the lino is. You’ll use these guides to line the lino up to each time you make a print.

Roll out your chosen ink colour on your tray and then ink up your lino. Making sure the lino is registered against the masking tape guides, line up the paper to the edge of the cardboard and lay gently over the lino. Press the paper down and place in your printing press if you have one, or use a brayer or the back of a spoon to apply pressure to the paper.

meking a reduction linoprint

Lift off the paper and lay the print out to dry. Print as many as you like – I created 5 prints. As you can see, the permanent marker left a slight pattern on the print but I don’t think this matters as it will get printed over eventually, plus I think it looks quite good – you could stop right here if you fancied!

Second colour linoprint

Once you have cleaned the lino thoroughly, cut away some more of the design. The areas you cut away now will remain bronze (or whichever colour you used first). As you can see I have cut away a bit more of the design, the permanent marker is still visible so I can use that as a guide.

reduction linoprint

Print your second colour, being careful to line up your lino and paper in the same way as before. Leave the print to dry – looking good huh?

cutting lino for print

Now we come the the last colour. Use your darkest colour for this layer. I’m cutting all the remaining areas away so I am just left with the permanent marker lines visible. I’m going to print this layer in black using the same registration method as before.

printing a linoprint

aztec inspired reduction linoprint

And here is the final print after 3 colours were printed. You can see clearly how the different colours have built up and why it’s important to start with the lightest colour and work up to the darkest.¬† These are great fun to do, and if you use water based ink they don’t take long to dry which means you can create lots of wonderful images in just a few hours. Go on – have a go!

aztec inspired reduction linoprint

aztec inspired reduction linoprint

super-cool-painted-chairs

How to: revamp an old wooden chair

super-cool-painted-chairs

I have couple of old wooden chairs kicking about which I thought would look amazing if they were given a bit of TLC, so I decided to paint them in some new, fresh colours. Here’s how:

 

You will need:

  • Course sandpaper
  • Finer sandpaper
  • Cloth to rub the chairs down with
  • Old-based primer or undercoat
  • Paint in your chosen colour
  • Paintbrush
  • Old wooden chair

The old chairs were covered in varnish so a heavy duty session of sanding was required. I don’t have any fancy equipment so three hours of elbow grease was in order. Choose very course sandpaper to make the job as easy as possible, and get in all the grooves and cracks.¬†Alternatively you can take furniture to get it stripped but it can cost quite a lot. I recommend against using paint stripper at home unless you have used it before – it’s a messy job using strong chemicals.

Chair before sanding

Chair before sanding

Rub down using a course sandpaper and lots of elbow gease!

Rub down using a course sandpaper and lots of elbow gease!

Once sanded, give it a quick wipe down with a wet cloth to get rid of any grit and dust and apply a coat of primer. This will help your paint ‘stick’ to the chair and hopefully prevent any peeling later on.

chair after sanding

…and after!

Adding a coat of primer

Adding a coat of primer

Once the primer has dried, give to chair another quick rub down with a finer sandpaper, just to even out and bumps of stroke marks in the paint, and then wipe down with a wet cloth again.

Sand down the primer

Sand down the primer

Once dry, the fun part begins! I chose a soft grey colour for one of the chairs and a bright blue for the other. The blue paint was from Habitat’s feature wall paint range which has lots of really gorgeous colours – I took a loooong time in the paint aisle I can tell you.

Painting the chair

Painting the chair

You will probably need two coats to get a nice solid finish. If you get any imperfections in the first coat, a quick rub down with the finer sandpaper and wipe with a wet cloth should do the trick.

Ta-da! The finished chairs.

Ta-da! The finished chairs.